Chic Scrapbooks

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 Embossing

Embossing is the art of creating a raised surface.  There are many tools to help create this effect.

 

Embossing Powders

Paper Crimper

Embossing Punches 

Embossing Powder Tips

Embossing Pad

Embossing Gun or Heat Tool

Embossing Markers

Embossing Stylus

 

Other topics:

Cutters

Rub-on Tape

Tips

Embossing

Glossary

Dry-Embossing

 

  Embossing Powders

Embossing powders come in a rainbow of colors, as well as a clear version that gives a shiny raised surface to the image.
The jars of embossing powder may look small, but they will actually last a long, long time. It only takes a small amount of powder to cover the ink on most stamped designs. While you may pour a lot of powder on to begin with, you can funnel the excess right back into the embossing powder jar. Pouring your powder over a piece of paper makes it easy to get the powder back into the jar. You can also get a small tray at your craft or rubber stamping store. The tray has a small capped funnel end, which lets you emboss over the tray, then pour the powder back into its jar.

 

 

Embossing Powder Tips

To apply embossing powder, you can either shake it out of the jar or use a small spoon to spoon the powder over the stamped image.
If your embossing powder is opaque you can use a clear or resist inkpad, or your favorite tinted inkpads.
If you are using clear or semitransparent embossing powder, keep in mind that the ink color you use will show through, so choose accordingly.
You can make make stronger more vibrant images by embossing a strong color powder over a matching color of ink -- for instance black on black, red on red, etc.
You can achieve a softer look by embossing with semitransparent or pearlescent powders, for instance a light pearlescent blue powder over navy blue or black ink.


There are four simple steps to embossing

Step 1. Stamp the image.
Step 2. Apply
embossing powder over the wet ink of the stamped image -- shake the paper slightly so that all ink areas get covered by the embossing powder.
Step 3. Pour off excess the powder, use your finger to "flick" the back of the paper in order to shake off any powder that lingers.
Step 4. Use an embossing
heat tool to apply heat until the powder melts (it only takes a few seconds and you can see the transformation).
Step 5. When you are finished you are left with a shiny raised or embossed image

Chic Tip:  When embossing intricate designs, especially with embossing markers, the ink tends to start drying before you apply the powder.  To "refresh" the moisture, give the inked area a huff (like you would do to steam a mirror).  This steam "refreshes" the moisture and allows the powder to stick.

Enjoy!
 

 
 

Tinted Embossing Pad

Embossing Pad

Used with Embossing Heat Tool or Gun and rubber or acrylic stamps.

Use this tinted pad to "ink" your rubber stamp, stamp it on your paper, sprinkle with embossing powder and heat with heat tool.

Chic Tip:  Use tinted embossing ink for easier application, it dries clear.

 

Heat Tool

Embossing Gun or Heat Tool

A handheld tool that blows warm/hot air used to melt embossing powder.  Can also be used to dry stamping or journaling ink.  Despite the similarities in appearance, embossing heat tools are not hair dryers. The heat tool concentrates the heat on a small area without nearly as much blowing as the hair appliance.

 

 

Embossing Markers

Embossing markers

Use embossing markers to write, draw or doodle on your page to create you own one of a kind embossed embellishments. 

Then apply the embossing powder and use heat tool as instructed below.

 

 

Embossing Stylus

The ball point is used to trace a template to create a raised or recessed design.

Also see dry embossing.

 

Embossing Punches

Work similar to paper punches except they do not cut through the paper, they press a shape into the paper.

 

 
 

Paper Crimper

Paper Crimper

An embossing tool that is used to emboss entire sheets of paper.  A sheet of paper is placed between two rollers and rolled through them crimping the paper into the pattern on the rollers.  Comes in many styles.

Here are some examples of different crimping patterns: